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>> mitchell: tonight, disaster in japan. in the aftermath of the massive earthquake, wide areas of japan's northeast coast lie in ruins without power or transportation. as officials say the death toll could well be over 1,000. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, nuclear concerns. an explosion rocks a nuclear power plant but leaves the nuclear core intact. now questions are being raised about nuclear safety both in japan and here at home. season at risk-- why the breakdown of nfl labor talks could mean no action on the nation's gridirons this fall. and quake questions-- this town prepared in the u.s. for an earthquake as strong as the one that hit japan. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. it is already sunday morning in japan, and another major aftershock has just hit the country which is still digging out after friday's disastrous 8.9-magnitude earthquake. here's the latest-- an explosion at a nuclear power plant forced 170,000 people to evacuate while an emergency was declared tonight at a second reactor in
waves, resulting from the 8.9 earthquake in japan. we're also told a great -- the great highway in san francisco has reopened and muni service has been restored. all right. we'll be back in 30 minutes, at:00. see you then. at 6:00. see you then. th s. a record earthquake in japan triggers a mammoth tsunami that washes away everything in its path. hundreds are dead. the search for victims, just beginning. i'm katie couric. extensive coverage to want of the disaster in japan. and the tsunami that spread across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched of
." >> japan's prime minister appeals for calm after a third explosion at the fukushima daichi. naoto kan said everyone within 20 kilometers should leave immediately. >> we need now for everybody to move out of the 20 kilometer radius from the number one plant. >> in cities and towns reduced to rubble by the tsunami which followed the earthquake, the death toll could be as many as 10,000. a country still literally shaken by the aftershocks is coming to grips with the recovery effort. it will take years and an immeasurable income impact. become to "bbc world news." broadcasting in the u.k. and around the world. in this program, confrontation in bahrain. protestors set up road blocks in the capital as 1,000 saudi troops enter the country, and the u.n. security council discusses a no-fly zone over libya but nothing is agreed. member states are too divided. there's been a third big explosion at the fukushima power plant in japan which was badly damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami. a four-fold increase in radiation levels has been released into the air surrounding the plant. the prime minist
touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.89, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top one thousand. most of the victims drowned. nearly one thousand are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that damage includes a nuclear reactor in northeastern japan. radiation levels are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history trigger
. >>shepard: thank you very much. good morning from tokyo. it's 4:00 a.m. in the capital city in japan, 3 p.m. in new york city and the japanese people will awake as the sunrises in an hour and 45 minutes to learn that power outages will be rolling across this nation as they work to conserve fuel as 30 percent of all energy across japan comes from nuclear power and now there are great concerns of nuclear meltdown on the northeast coast a couple of hundred kilometers from where we are now. behind me is the rainbow bridge a fixture in tokyo. it is usually lit up in many colors and it is shut down as are the tops of skyscrapers as they work for voluntary energy conservation in the hopes that extra tokyo will not have to face the kind of black outs that could be necessary across this nation. high alert cross japan with nuclear concerns, thousands of people washing ashore, and many thousands still missing, and a disaster which the prime minister says here tokyo and the rest of the japan have not seen since world war ii. it began with an epic earthquake the most powerful earthquakes on record, th
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
in japan. this is new video of when the powerful tsunami hit. watch this. a tsunami wave swallowing up this town. water rushing over homes, sending them splintering into pieces. over on top of their buildings. homes ripped from their foundation sending down a river of destruction. that's awesome in its powerfulness to watch. fears of a nuclear meltdown after this explosion rocked the fukushima nuclear plants. they continue yet again today. good morning. good to have you along with us. welcome, allison. >> the images out of japan are jaw dropping. this is a buddhist temple rocking back and forth from the sheer jolt of the quake. rescue and relief efforts are now underway. millions of people are left without food, water and electricity for days. japanese officials near thousands of people may be dead. bill: we have julian from sendai in northern japan where the tsunami came onshore near this nuclear power plants. what's the latest from there? >> i have been down by the sendai airport watching the japanese military collecting body parts from the paddy fields around the airport. the power
at a nuclear plant in japan grows my dire by the hour. tonight, the warning from the united states top nuclear chief. plus, the workers who stayed behind and put their lives on the line. i'm shepard smith live in tokyo. the news starts now. they fight their way through radiation and dodge explosions in the dark. risking their own lives for their country. the unseen heros who may be japan's last line of defense against an even bigger disaster. meanwhile, an emotional reunion for one quake survivor. but search crews also finding more victims. and one relief worker says the situation at the shelters is getting desperate. >> the stores are empty. nothing is getting through here. >> shepard: plus, an american who lived through the quake and tsunami finally gets word to her family. now, the battle to bring her home. most experts say the radiation will not reach the united states. lots of americans apparently are not listening. tonight the iodine rush and the reality check. good thursday morning from tokyo just past 8:00 a.m. where the situation is devolving quickly. there is now no water, according
: box number one, japan's government raising the threat level of the damaged nuclear plant. box two, we hear that the japanese officials considering the so-called chernobyl opening to bring the plant under control. live coverage and what that may mean ahead. box three: president obama getting ready for a five-day trip to south america in the middle of all that is happening in japan and the middle east and right here at home. we will discuss the timing with chris wallace. that is ahead unless breaking news changes everything. in "studio b" today. and from japan the government has officially raised the threat level of the badly damaged fukushima nuclear power plant from a level 4 to a level 5 and that is on an international scale of 7 and it puts it on par with the disaster at three mile island. the worst nuclear accident in american history. for context, a level 5 nuclear emergency entails severe damage to a reactor core; the release of massive amount of radiation and high problem deficit of significant public exposure," and several deaths from radiation, and from the director of the pow
noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of state hillary clinton says the u.s. is sending coolant. >> there are fires as well, though, burning across the region with several major explosions, and japanese oil an chemical plants, you are looking at one over the oil
of what's happened in japan. >> he is a supporter of the nuclear industry, but with a big push lately to rest restart our stalled reaction of the nuclear power plant capability. this is causing real concern and soul searching>> there are 442 nuclear reactors operating in the world right now. 55 are in japan. 6 of those have had problems since the earthquake and ju tsui the past week. this is what the boiling water reactor looks like now. you can see the explosion happened in the secondary containment area but at this point in time the primary containment area remains in tact. for historical context the international atomic energy uses a 7 level scale for the nuclear event level one is an anomaly but a second is an accident. chernobyl was a 7 right now japan is a 4. that's what a nuclear expert said this morning and he added it could soon become a five. >> the worse case scenario is that the fuel rods fuse together the temperatures get so hot they melt together into a radioactive molten mass of mechanisms and is exposed to the outside. there are few radioactive it in to the ground into
's first from fox this friday night. we're getting a look at the day after in japan now. and we're getting an idea of the enormous devastation there after the massive earthquake shoocket northeastern part of that country and a major tsunami then drowned it. police say hundreds of people are already confirmed dead. entire neighborhoods in ruins or under water. at least four entire passenger trains missing. officials at a nuclear power plant are trying to prevent a meltdown and dozens of powerful after shocks are rippling across the country. the mega quake hit in the middle of japan friday. it carried magnitude of .. that makes it nearly 8,000 times more powerful than the that's correct devastated new zealand last month. cameras captured the moment it struck. pieces of buildings plummeting to the street as people run for their lives. in a newsroom right near the quake's epicenter cabinets and computers rocked wildly and fell to the floor. almost immediately the earthquake spawned enormous tsunami. witnesses say it was as high as 30 feet in some areas. and you see it racing into the coast an
rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national security correspondent david martin at the pentagon. >> an unmanned reconnaissance zone takes off from sicily to survey the damage done by american missiles and bombs. an overhead photo shows what happened to the battlefield. >> you can see the shelters, one of which we have blown up here that is actuall
the united states will play... playy.. new radiation concerns in japan the foods that radioactive materials have been detected in ... ... weather open open "i dont know what ould ok." . im glad the kids are - a group of kids sick at school ...the substance they ate --- and who gave it to them... them... and a free surgery ---the controverssal operation these want... 3- a developing story out of libya tonight ----hello i'm the u-s and french militaries fired missiles into libya.it's an internatiinal mission folbaum reports ... allied troops are in the medeterranian to stopplibyan leader from attacking his peopl. peeple. -------------------------------- p------------------------------- -------------------------------- -------------------------------- --------the u-s -- taking part in an international military operation to prooect people in libba. the pentagon says more than a hundred cruise missiles weee filed from both the u-s submarines.... attacking thee libyyn air defense systems. statement during his visit to brazil. obama: "the us is acting ... ... libyan people." eerlier france l
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
>> jamie: at this hour we are getting word from japan there could be a third nuclear plant in trouble there. sources are saying that the american committee in japan is reporting update that the plan may have similar plants to explosion from yesterday, partial meltdown. keep it on fox. we'll send it to washington now have a good day. >> shannon: i'm shannon bream live in washington. we begin america's news headquarters with the fox news alert. japan is reeling from what he is calling the worst crisis since world war ii. the threat of nuclear disaster is growing as they try to avert multiple meltdown in nuclear reactors. thousands are dead from the earthquake and the tsunami it caused and more than a million people are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nucle
in japan and beyond as a nation in i sis is forced to make very tough decisions. the battle for libya intensifying as rebels take a beating and government forces engage in nonstop shelling. will benghazi fall to moammar gadhafi. they are criticizing the president on not responding to issues at home and a broad. its all on "happening now." a good wednesday to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom and happening right now as jon just mentioned brand-new developments in the nuclear crisis that is gripping japan and company company taourg all of our attention. emergency workers who have have now dubbed the fukushima 50 risking their lives to prevent further disaster. this after another fir fire has broken out at the nuke plant. radiation is 300 times normal. jon: the numbers today are staggering, millions across japan struggling with very little food and water. nearly half a million people there are homeless now, and some 3700 listed as dead, but that number sure will he will rise with ten thousand people still missing in one northeastern city alone. mar
gwen: ripple effects from japan to libya and everywhere in between as the world works with the fallout from uprising and disaster. tonight on "washington week." >> ample warning was given qaddafi needed to stop his campaign of oppression or be held accountable. gwen: as muammar qaddafi closes in on rebels, the world community reacts. >> i urge you to immediately cease-fire and work with the resolution. >> the violence must stop, the killing must stop and the people of libya must be protected and have the opportunity to express themselves freely. gwen: will can do you havey he -- will qaddafi lose his grip? are we on the brink of all-out war? while on the other side of the world, japan copes with a disaster of biblical proportions. after the quake. after the flood. now nuclear fallout. >> there's no water in the spent fuel pool and we believe radiation levels are extremely high. gwen: how japan's calamity could affect us all. covering the week, tom gjelten of npr, coral davenport of "national journal" and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning repor
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>> chris: i'm chri chris walla. the latest on the battle in libya and the nuclear crisis in japan. right now on "fox news sunday." missile strikes. the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles as coalition forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update on talk with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen live on "fox news sunday." then two leading senators weigh in on the mix, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works t work contain a nr disaster. we will get the latest from japan and talk with the secretary of energy steven chu. plus, we ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on these issues or following. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington where we are tracking two major stories. we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and its allies are using military force to protect the antiqaddafi rebels. and in japan, where officials are making progress toward bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that later and talk with the secretary of en
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
inaudible] >> from the japanese media because, obviously, we're concerned about what's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i'm with a japanese newspaper. i have two questions with the tragedy in japan. i would like to ask you about your personal feelings. you went to japan last year and waves have washed away cars and houses and the japanese people are devastated. i want to ask for your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and, secondly, you touched on the possible assistance from the united states to japan. and the japanese government reports that japan asked for help from united states forces in japan. are you waiting to provide that assistance? >> the answer to the second question is, yes. i told the prime minister that we'd provide whatever assistance. i think the biggest help will be the cleanup. when you have a tsunami as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions, both in infrastructure, boats, houses, cars, that are washed into main thoroughfares and that requires heavy equipment and so any assistance that we can provide, we'll be providing. i'm heartbroken b
>> couric: tonight, from the air and from the ground, japan launches a water assault on those damaged nuclear reactors to try to cool them. and a voluntary evacuation of americans is under way. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama tries to reassure this country we are safe. >> we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast. >> couric: libya's moammar qaddafi vows to retake all rebel-held territory as the u.n. considers military action to stop him. and from hiroshima to fukushima, her fear that japan is on the verge of another nuclear catastrophe. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. there is so much concern in this country about nuclear radiation from jay japan that president obama went on national television today to try to calm every down. he said he does not expect harmful levels of radiation from those damaged reactors to reach hawaii, alaska, or the west coast. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americ
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may h
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: a massive earthquake struck japan today, the largest in the nation's history. it triggered tsunami waves that killed at least 1,000 people. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
in the area around japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant today, forcing emergency workers to temporarily abandon the facility, as tens of thousands of homeless struggled with snows and bitter cold. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on efforts to control the growing crisis in japan, including the stories of survivors and rescue crews in towns virtually wiped out by the tsunami. >> woodruff: we examine the health risks from the radiation spewing from the reactors and being carried by the wind far from japan's shores. >> ifill: plus, kwame holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grad
u.s. nuclear plants. as the crisis? squaw pan deepened -- as the crisis in japan deepening, they called for the closure of the indian point power plant outside new york city. and connecticut senator joe lieberman saying we should put the brakes on building any new reactors in the u.s. so could what happened in japan happen here? and does the disaster spell the end for the nuclear power industry in the u.s.? joining the panel this week our columnist and deputy editor. kim, you have been reporting this story all week. what is the u.s. nuclear industry saying about the disaster in japan? >>> there are big differences here, paul, and it shouldn't stop nuclear power. here is why -- one of the worst things that can happen to a power plant is station black ut yo. that is the total cut of yo from the electrical grid that powerers the pump. and because the facility is so concerned they always have back up plans. the japanese had back up plans, but they were not robust enough to deal with a tsunami the size that came in. it swept away the fuel tanks that ran the back up generators. i
. this morning, the japan prime minister is calling for help with rebuilding the company. charlie d'agata reports. >> reporter: moments ago the prime minister said the government is sharing all the information it has about the crisis at the nuclear power plant. people were evacuated from the region around the nuclear power plant and many feel they may never get back home. >>> reporter: fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippled nuclear power plant as crews raced to restore power to the facility. as early as today, they hoped to feed electricity to at least two of the six overheated reactors and get crucial water pumps working again. >> if the cooling systems in the reactors and fuel ponds are basically sound and then the power comes on, then we might look at that moment as the beginning of the end of this crisis. >> reporter: but even if the power starts back up, it's not clear the water pumps will. they may have already suffered too much damage. there are also fears that getting power back online could spark another explosion. smoke billowed again from one reactor today. water in t
nations takes brand new action. and here in japan the desperate effort to cool the nuclear contractor. an extension cord more than half a mile long could provide the best chance yet of prevent ago nuclear breakdown. this is breaking news now on fox news channel, i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> shepard: they are attacking the problem from the air and the ground. part of the effort to cool down those fuel rods and reactors. >> even as japanese responders continue to do heroic work, we know that the damage to the nuclear reactors poses a substantial risk. >> shepard: and officials say what happens in the hours ahead is absolutely critical. plus, a new move to pull americans out of the danger zone. >> i'm concerned because i really don't know the situation about the radiation. >> shepard: tonight, the escape from japan. and good friday morning from tokyo where there is breaking news at the fukushima nuclear plant. multiple reports now indicate crews have successfully hooked up an emergency power cable to one of the plant's reactors. they have call it unit 2. we are waiting for
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
that at least one of the reactors at japan's fukushima power plant is leaking. officials have found plutonium around the plant, and highly radioactive water has been discovered for the first time outside the building. the tokyo electric power company, tepco, maintains it poses no health risk to humans. we have this report. >> plutonium habeen found in five spots around fukushima, but tepco insists the levels are not harmful. >> the level detective is extremely small and will not affect human health. -- the level detected. >> they were trying to stay on top of the situation. now, a government reesentative is says that there may have been a partial meltdown inside reactor number two, this after water rose to more than 100,000 times its normal level over the weekend. they now have to pump out the contaminated water before they continue to work on reestablishing the cooling system. engineers can only spend a few minutes at a time in the reactor buildings due to the radiation levels. >> when you are inside, you are coaminated by radiation. i was exposed over five days. the longer you spend inside,
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: workers at japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop g
chief for criticizing japan officials. the u.n. says, we have to wait for more news. that's what we'll do. jon: so much confusion and it doesn't help anyone. thanks for joining us. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: thanks, guys, this is a fox news alert. anger and frustration intensifying in japan's nuclear crisis right now. there are new reports that u.s. forces helping in relief efforts are being ordered to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled fukushima plant. you are looking at up-close video of the reactors, where conditions took a turn for the worse. a big jump in radiation levels forced the teams to leave the plant and abandon efforts to cool down the reactors. experts say that radiation has traveled far beyond the 20-mile radius. the pentagon assuring that u.s. forces will have to stay away unless they have special authorization. we're getting reports that evacuation shelters are running out of food and basic necessities. many victims reportedly furious over the government's response. trace gallagher picks up the story from there. trace? >> reporter: the
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
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